Workbench #5: Goatboy’s kitchen

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This is a bit of a sidetrack from the Workbench Project but fret not; it will bring us back on topic before this post is done. Continue reading “Workbench #5: Goatboy’s kitchen”

The Funeral Chair Part Two – Finish and Glue Up

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20150731_154041With all the parts now essentially completed it was time to sand them down ready for pre-finishing. On a project like this it is far easier to finish the components before final assembly. The finish I used for this project was a homemade oil/varnish concoction. Taking advice from various online sources I mixed boiled linseed oil, polyurethane varnish and white spirit (mineral spirits in the US) in equal parts.  Continue reading “The Funeral Chair Part Two – Finish and Glue Up”

Sawyer’s Bench #6

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This is my last post on the Sawyer’s Bench because, barring further coats of finish, the project is complete.

I wasn’t sure what finish to use on this project. Tom Fidgen didn’t put a finish on his apparently, but I asked him for advice and he said that he would use a boiled linseed oil and wax mixture.

Luckily, I had a few blocks of 1oz. beeswax and some linseed oil so, when I was ready to finish, I set about making my own concoction. I went for an 8:1 mix of oil and wax, mixing them by heating them in an old wok over a pan of boiling water on an electric hob. A gas hob is not advisable as boiled linseed oil is flammable. Continue reading “Sawyer’s Bench #6”

Marking Gauges

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I have made a couple of marking gauges recently, both out of walnut offcuts. The one on the left is a centre gauge, for marking the centre line down the length of narrow stock of varying widths. One simply twists the gauge until both pins are in contact with the side of the work piece, and then by dragging the tool down the length of the wood, the marking pin scribes a centre line. Continue reading “Marking Gauges”

Joiners Mallet

A little while ago a friend popped in with some presents for me – three logs. One of apple, one of ash and a smaller one of acacia (myrtle). I had put word about that I was interested in some big lumps of seasoned hardwood to make a mallet from.20150227_144844

It was after watching these videos from Paul Sellers that I first became interested in making my own mallet. He uses oak in the videos, but I had read somewhere that apple was quite a traditional wood for mallet heads, so I decided to go with that. Continue reading “Joiners Mallet”

Thinking ahead

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When I demolished my old shed, I pretty much got rid of everything of the structure, apart from one thing. I saved a large beam, 3″ by 9″ by 15′. I cut it up into three sections and they are stored in my new shed. One of these fine days I intend planing them up, jointing them and laminating them to form the top of a Roubo style workbench.

Continue reading “Thinking ahead”

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